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Over 70 Trees Planted in Piedmont Park

With a rapidly increasing population in Atlanta, fighting negative environmental impacts can seem impossible. However, the solution to this issue can be found in Piedmont Park: trees.

To prepare for the increase in visitors that spring brings, the Piedmont Park Conservancy has been hard at work over the past two months to ensure that the Park stays green and gorgeous for all. After collaborating with Trees Atlanta, Grady High School and our own staff and board members, 74 new trees were planted on Oak Hill, the Meadow and in the Dog Parks. These trees will help keep the Park cooler during the warm spring and summer months, remove pollution from the air and be a home for native birds and other pollinators.

Urban trees provide a multitude of benefits for all Park visitors including clean air, shade in the summer, a food source for pollinators and  a connection to a place and time. Newly planted trees offer hope for the future, and mature trees that live for 100 years act as historical markers for time and events. – Erica Glasener, Community Involvement and Events Manager

The Piedmont Park Conservancy is looking forward to continuing our dedication to providing a green space that is clean, safe and beautiful. However, we cannot do it alone. Your donation supports our efforts and keeps historic Piedmont Park clean, green and active.

Replacement of Piedmont Park’s Beloved Climbing Magnolia

The Vasser Woolley Foundation donates $20,000 for tree and care

In spring of last year, Piedmont Park was highlighted in the AJC for being home to the most recognizable and most photographed tree in Atlanta – the “Climbing Magnolia.” If you grew up in Atlanta, or are a frequent park visitor, chances are you have either climbed on this tree yourself or taken a picture in front it. Its sweeping limbs made the perfect perch for that keepsake photo or unique vantage point of Atlanta’s historic park.

But in July 2016, the Climbing Magnolia sadly toppled over succumbing to a column of rot that had weakened its core. Based on its rings, many believe the magnolia dates back to the Cotton States Exhibition in 1895 -an important milestone in Atlanta’s history.

Fortunately, a 20’ magnolia, with a 70” root ball, weighing over 8,000 lbs has been successfully installed in Piedmont Park. The Piedmont Park Conservancy extends great appreciation to the Vasser Woolley Foundation for donating $20,000 towards the replacement, installation and ongoing care of this iconic Atlanta landmark. The Conservancy looks forward to the many years ahead of the new Magnolia.

Moments before the new Magnolia Tree is planted.

Jennifer Rudder places her hand on the 70″ root ball.

Piedmont Park Conservancy staff members Krystal Collier, Amy Han Dietrich, Jennifer Rudder and Terrell Henderson posing by the new magnolia tree.

Waterfall Foundation donates $100,000 to Piedmont Park Conservancy

The Piedmont Park Conservancy is delighted to receive a $100,000 grant from the Waterfall Foundation to improve and repair the Park’s water fountains. Due to heavy park use, the water fountains are in frequent need of repair and it is one of most common complaints from park visitors.  The grant will allow the Conservancy to replace the internal supply and drainage system for all 27 drinking fountains throughout the park. The project is scheduled to begin in April and is estimated to take four weeks to complete. More information to follow.

A big thank you to the Waterfall Foundation for this generous contribution to enhance the Piedmont Park experience.