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Exploring Piedmont Park’s Northwoods

One of Atlanta’s best features is its easy access to incredible outdoor experiences in the Appalachians. For this reason, many of us can’t imagine living in a city without a short drive to abundant natural space. But for those who feel a lot more relaxed outside, midweek in the city can start to feel a little too cramped. Luckily, you don’t have to wait for the weekend!

You are probably familiar with Piedmont Park’s popular destinations like the Meadow, or the Dog Parks, and all 200 plus acres of the Park are great places to spend some time outdoors. Just north of those locations, though, the paths lead you through a tucked away tree lined expansion to the Park. This is over 53 acres added in 2011 that boast nature trails and conservation areas, Legacy Fountain, the Northwoods, and the Piedmont Commons. After a brief foray through these paths you’re sure to find your breathing calmed and eyes open to the chirping birds, rustling chipmunks, and all the colors of life. Here are some amazing views in the Piedmont Park expansion that feel miles away from the city.

Where better in the Park to sit and read or write for an hour, or two, or three or four? You don’t get the distractions of festivals out here, just the ambient sounds of nature and the words on the page!

A short walk past the Conservancy offices is the Promenade Lawn, a beautiful clearing on a plateau in the treetops to the east.

A look at forest serenity, but only a stone’s throw from your door! Find the wooden staircase in the Walker Woods for these unpaved views.

Another great place to sit and read, you can find this stone mini-theater in the Six Springs Wetland near the Dog Parks.

Straight outta Narnia, you find yourself on the other side of the wardrobe in the Northwoods’ forested paths.

Author: William Lange

Four of the Best Fall Foliage Spots at Piedmont Park

UPDATE – November 6: Leaves are peaking! Visit Piedmont Park for that awesome fall photo and use #PiedmontParkProud when posting on social!

September 22 marked the first day of autumn, and we’re excited! During this season, plenty of fall activities occur. Families pose for holiday photos in front of red mountains. Children dive in large piles of crunchy yellow leaves for sport and contest. Couples partake in a picnic under the perfect orange-leafed tree. Others simply enjoy watching the leaves transform color, which they can easily observe at Piedmont Park. With that said, here are a few main areas that the Piedmont Park Conservancy recommends to view the fall foliage.

Piedmont Park in Fall

For one, the 14th Street gate near the Piedmont Driving Club is a popular location to watch the leaves change, according to Mark Nelson, the Director of Operations for the Piedmont Park Conservancy.

“We’ve got some large gingko trees that have a beautiful fall color,” Nelson says. “They turn bright yellow. When you have a nice clear day and that sun shines on those trees, it puts a yellow glow on the ground. A lot of people like taking photos under that tree.”

Nelson guesses that the gingko tree will probably turn quickly at the end of October, only lasting a few days.

Gingko Tree’s Leaves Changing

Gingko Tree’s Leaves Changing

Park Drive bridge, which is above the dog park and by the Meadow, is another location where visitors can watch the leaves change.

“You have a couple of bald cypress,” Nelson says. “You have red dawns and redwoods. They turn a really brilliant rust color. The bald cypress are in the lake, and the red dawns are behind it. They look like the same tree, but they’re not. If you come down Park Drive, on the left-hand side, just before you get to the garden and beehives, there’s a hickory that turns bright yellow. It’s really beautiful.”

Red Dawn Trees Along Lake Clara Meer

Oak Hill and the Active Oval are two more go-to spots for this activity.

“If you get up on Oak Hill and stand at the top, looking down toward the lake, you can see a lot of different colors, especially all the trees that surround the lake,” Nelson says. “It’s a nice area to look at fall colors, too. If you’re standing in the Active Oval and you look toward the city, you can see a lot of fall colors there, too.”

Pignut Hickory on Oak Hill

Nelson mentions the leaves aren’t changing as of yet. Perhaps the leaves may turn the first week of November.

“We’ve had such dry weather here in September leading into October,” he says. “They’re kind of late right now falling; we hadn’t had the cold temperatures yet for them to turn. However, we recently had a few cold mornings and cold evenings that tend to turn the leaves quicker. This week, I think we’ll get to see quite a few leaves turn color.”

He also lists a variety of trees to watch for during the fall, such as dogwoods that turn rich red and sugar maples that change to a vivid orange-yellow.

Sugar Maple Leaves

Red Maple Trees

“Blackgum trees turn a bright red,” Nelson says. “October glories are a red-orange color or a red-sunset. We have all kinds of oaks that have different colors to them. They kind of have more of a red tint to them. Green ash turn a really beautiful yellow.”

Director of Operations Mark Nelson

With over 115 tree varieties, residents and Atlanta visitors can visit Piedmont Park to submerse themselves in vibrant reds, yellows, and oranges that will awe them at every turn. As Nelson reminds us, “If you live in the city and don’t see a lot of trees, then you can come to Piedmont Park and see them.”

Tag Piedmont Park on Instagram @piedmontpark of your latest fall photos. Also, check out Piedmont Parks’s self-guided tree tour.

UPDATE – November 6: Leaves are peaking! Visit Piedmont Park for that awesome fall photo and use #PiedmontParkProud when posting on social!

Guest Post by Annierra Matthews

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