Over 900 Dogs at Splish Splash Doggie Bash

On October 6th and 7th, over 900 dogs had the time of their lives – courtesy of Piedmont Park Conservancy and its 10th annual Splish Splash Doggie Bash. This special event allows dogs to have the Piedmont Park Aquatic Center all to themselves and was a hit among the dog owners and lovers of Atlanta, so much so that it sold out! Lines formed early Saturday and Sunday morning full of excited pups of all shapes and sizes ready to get their paws wet and owners ready to make their dogs’ wildest dreams come true.

The Conservancy stocked the pool with tennis balls and Frisbees galore, and opened the gates to doggie heaven for all the anxious pups waiting outside. Whether it was swimming, playing fetch in the grass, or making new friends, the dogs had a blast. Thanks to Victory Brewing Company, the dog owners were able to kick back, grab a beer and watch their pups take it all in. After the first session of the weekend, many people thought just an hour and 15 minutes wasn’t enough for their loyal companions, so they purchased tickets for more sessions. Some even attended all of the sessions!

The dog vendors were also a highlight of this years’ event. Many vendors set up tables by the pool and displayed their products for the owners to choose from. Needless to say, many lucky pups went home with some tasty new treats.

Overall Splish Splash Doggie Bash was a huge success and raised necessary funds for the Conservancy’s three acre off-leash dog park. It’s definitely something you won’t want to miss in the coming years!

Author: Olivia Gage

Love dog events? Check out Doggie Dash which occurs every March!

New Exhibitat Welcomes Home the Chimney Swift

The Atlanta Audubon Society, in partnership with the Piedmont Park Conservancy, City of Atlanta Parks and Recreation Department, has installed a new home for an exceptional little bird known as the Chimney Swift. You may have already noticed the chimney-like tower in the northern area of Piedmont Park called the Piedmont Commons. It sits amidst a verdant field of flowers and grasses that will attract pollinators and other insects, which fosters a vibrant and exciting natural habitat for the chimney swift to prosper.

This new addition to wildlife preservation in Piedmont Park blends perfectly with the Conservancy’s Field Trip programs, bringing another unique and important education opportunity to the children of Atlanta as they interact with nature. The tower and surrounding area also presents a new beautiful aesthetic for all to enjoy in the North area of the Park!

The unveiling was a lively and creative event which kicked off with local nonprofits and artists participating in a chalk festival. Each chalk display showed a little piece of the organization’s soul and passion for Georgia conservation efforts, and proved that members of these organizations have no shortage of artistic skill!

Thank you, Krystal Collier and Kalia Edmonds, for your amazing chalk contribution!

Chalk Festival Winner: Sierra Club

After the festival, guests mingled and viewed the tower while enjoying cheese, fruit, and an Orpheus beer brewed specially for the occasion, aptly named “Little Birds Have Fast Hearts.” Since the Chimney Swift tower was the result of great partnerships between multiple nonprofits to bring a dream to life, there were many speakers contributing words of support and gratitude.

“If we are able to expose our kids to nature, I believe that we can solve a lot of the world’s problems,” says Piedmont Park Conservancy President & CEO Mark Banta, as he explains how this tower is a great addition to our camp and field trip program.

Finally, to celebrate the official grand opening of the tower, the event concluded with a ribbon cutting.

From Left to Right: Mark Banta, Jan Harralson, Dan Calvert, Jason Ward, Councilwoman Jennifer Ide, Lillie Kline, Nikki Belmonte, Ron Salzer, and Esther Stokes.

You may still be asking yourself, who is this bird, and what does the tower do for it?

The Chimney Swift loves living in tight spaces with a large group of other Chimney Swifts, and due to their very short legs, they can only perch on vertical surfaces. Over the years, this has led these birds to most commonly find a home in the chimneys of human houses. Chimneys, however, are on the decline, leaving many Chimney Swifts hard-pressed to find a suitable living situation. Piedmont Park’s new Chimney Swift tower will be the perfect new home for many as they begin to gather after their mating season. Don’t forget to watch for the little aerobatic birds coming and going from Piedmont Park’s new chimney!

Author: William Lange

Six Ways Parks Can Help You Stay Healthy

Do you want to live a long, healthy, and happy life?

It’s easy. In fact, it’s as easy as a walk in the park.

Public parks are known for their beauty or recreational value. But the biggest benefit lies in what they can do for your physical and mental health.

Let’s have a look:

1. Parks encourage physical activity

Everybody knows regular exercise is the key to maintaining your health but very few manage to do it. In a survey, more than 75% of participants said that they want to be fit but only 31% said that they exercise on a regular basis.

One of the biggest problems is the absence of a convenient place like parks. This research confirms that people are a lot more likely to exercise if they are living near to a park. The participants mentioned parks as the most common place for exercise. Another study by the Rand Corporation reveals that 50% of all vigorous exercises take place in the parks.

American Journal of Preventive Medicine did a meta-analysis of various studies and concluded that awareness and access to places for exercise can result in a 48.4% increase in physical activity. It will improve aerobic capacity, flexibility, and help weight loss.

Even if you are not moving a muscle and just spending some time in the park, it will improve your perceived health and lower blood pressure, according to this study by Penn State University.

You should be aiming for a lot more than perception though. You don’t need anything fancy. Parks are the best place to follow a walking or jogging routine and just 20 – 30 minutes of running can transform your life.

2. Parks enhance your mood and mental health:

Are you feeling down? Stressed? Or depressed? One of the easiest ways to improve your mood is to go to a park.

These places have some magic about them.

Spending just 10 minutes in a park can improve your mood and reduce stress. Take a book for even better results because leisure activities in the park can improve your sense of wellness.

Research confirms that taking a stroll in natural surrounding can decrease mental activity that leads to depression. Not to forget that exercise is the best antidepressant and sometimes, as effective as drugs. Here’s another study that confirms spending time in the park can be relaxing for the mind.

Most of our mental issues stem from negative thinking. Parks can help you look at the positive side of things. A team of researchers analyzed 2.2 million tweets and found that the tweets from parks were more positive than the ones from residential areas or transport hubs.

The mental health benefits are not limited to mood enhancement. Research has shown that spending some time in parks can restore mental energy, improve short-term memory, improve concentration, and boost creativity.

Oh, and it will also improve your sleep quality so your mind gets the much-needed rest.

3. Green space improves the quality of life:

Green is the color of life.

It is often associated with nature, sense of wellbeing, harmony, and a clean environment. Studies confirm that people with a regular view of trees or greenery from their homes or offices are less likely to suffer from mental fatigue or depression.

Parks are the perfect place to de-stress and wind down after a hectic day. Looking at the greenery will alleviate your diastolic blood pressure. People feel more calm and relaxed when they are around plants and flowers.

Many hospitals have parks or gardens because it supports recovery and improves immune response. Research has shown than greenery can produce positive health, social and environmental outcomes. This is why horticulture therapy is used for mental health treatment, community-based programs, or prisons. People working in offices with natural elements report higher well-being.

4. Parks contribute to social wellbeing:

Loneliness can be twice as deadly as obesity. It is as harmful as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. Social isolation leads to problems like dementia, blood pressure, and substance abuse. A meta-analytic review of 150 studies suggests that people with strong social connections have a 50% increased likelihood of survival, regardless of their age or health.

Park is a great place to meet new people and make friends. Research has shown that kids with close friends have higher self-esteem and they do better academically. Not only that, but they will grow up to become more confident and less depressive by the age of 25.

For seniors, living a socially active life means higher late life satisfaction and a less severe decline in the old age.

5. Environmental benefits of parks:

The health benefits of the parks are not limited to people who visit them. The trees and plants have tremendous environmental benefits for the entire neighborhood.

They improve air quality by absorbing carbon dioxide and emitting oxygen. Harmful particles and gases like Nitrogen oxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, etc. are also taken care of.

They provide the much-needed shelter and keep the temperatures in control. They do it by absorbing water and releasing it in the air. NASA reported an increase of 5º to 8º degrees in Atlanta where 380,000 acres of trees were bulldozed. That’s how big of a difference they make.

Trees can also save water and prevent soil erosion. The lack of trees results in serious problems like heat-island-effect and smog. This is why the US Environmental protection agency recommends parks and green roofs to combat these problems.

6. Spend quality time with your loved ones:

Do you find it difficult to motivate your kids to be active?

A study found that kids living near the parks are more active. Physical activity or outdoor games are incredibly good for their physical, mental, and emotional development.

Research has shown that children who spend time with their fathers have improved self-esteem, higher IQ, better health, and they are less likely to get into trouble.

And it’s good for you too. In a survey, 46% of people said that their loved ones help them make healthy choices in life.

These are just some benefits but we’d love to hear from you. Are you a regular visitor to the park? How has it benefited you? Please share your thoughts and comments on this.

Guest Post by Sadaqut Ullah Khan
Author: Research Analyst and Writer at RunRepeat.com

First Day of Summer: Are you in the know?

Although the heat has been blazing in Atlanta for the past couple of months, June 21st marked the first official day of summer. Now that the season is finally here, the question is how to spend it? To make this summer one to remember, head to Piedmont Park and involve the family in some outdoor fun! Whether it’s swimming the afternoon away or going to one of the Park’s many events, Piedmont Park has plenty of options for how you can make the most of the warm weather and clear skies–all in Atlanta’s backyard.

Events, Events and More Events

For an exciting weekend activity, rally up your crew and add a Park event to your summer schedule. For starters, the Horizon Theatre will be performing their hit musical, “Freaky Friday” on the Promenade through June 23. Attendees can bring blankets, low-back chairs and a picnic packed with dinner for a night of song, dance and boisterous laughter! With July arrives our Runaway Bride 5K, an event dedicated to the brides, grooms, bridesmaids, groomsmen, and “always-a-guests” out there looking for an excuse to flex their running/walking chops (and get a free t-shirt while they’re at it.) Dog lovers should check out a pup-friendly dog contest happening in early August at which one lucky dog will be named Piedmont Park’s Dog of the Year.

Don’t Forget the Sunscreen!

Grab your towels and pool supplies for a cool down at Piedmont Park’s popular Aquatic Center, which features a pool with four lap lanes and plenty of shaded tables. There’s also the Legacy Fountain Splash Pad, a popular spot for kids who enjoy zig-zagging through its 70 jets. When you get hungry, check out our concessions: King of Pops, offering ice-cold popsicles or The Market where you can indulge in a savory lunch with options like the “Slow Pork & Mango Cuban” sandwich and the “Heart of the Park” hot dog.

Bikes R Us

Imagine this: You’re on a bike, cool air graces your face with each tire rotation and you’re surrounded by lush greenery. This could be you at Piedmont Park, where visitors can pedal on paved paths that lead to every corner of the Park for ample exploration. No bike? No problem. Atlanta’s low-cost Relay Bike Share bicycles are available to rent, allowing anyone to hop off their ride at seemingly every turn to take in the beautiful scenery.

Learn Something New!

Take a leisurely stroll through the Park and learn some interesting tidbits about the Park’s storied past by going on one of our free docent-led history tours. Lead yourself on a self-guided tour to explore the most photographed locations in the Park or make a game of spotting the some of the oldest trees in Atlanta. Bird walks are offered in collaboration with the Atlanta Audubon Society; hone your observation skills and impress your friends with your newfound knowledge of unique bird calls.

Don’t Miss Our Future Events!

Guest Post by Aliya Seymour

How to Build Running Stamina

Recent news releases announced that the City of Atlanta will be the host of the USA’s women’s and men’s marathon Olympic qualifying team race for the 2020 games. It’s an exciting time to be a runner in Atlanta, and no doubt many people will also be inspired by the incoming onslaught of Olympic-caliber marathoners hoping to make the US Olympic marathon team that they, too, may consider lacing up their shoes for the first time.

When you’re new to running, though, it can be really intimidating to figure out how to start or where to start. Most people intuitively know, for example, that they’re probably not going to be able to start at zero and suddenly just go run a marathon the next day. How you get to that point, though, remains a mystery for many people. They may want to run a marathon themselves one day, but how they go about doing that — how you can build running stamina when you’re currently at zero — is a bit of an enigma.

Building running stamina isn’t as mysterious as you may think. Below, I’ll provide some tips and guidelines that will help you build your running stamina slowly and safely. Who knows? Maybe by the time the Olympic marathon trials are in Atlanta for the 2020 Olympics, you’ll have even finished your first endurance race by then!

Some tips to help you build running stamina include the following:

Before anything, talk to your doc. Just to be on the safe side, particularly if you haven’t seen your physician in a while, go in and get his/her blessing. Make sure that running will be a physically safe endeavor for you and that you don’t have some lurking ailment or illness under the hood, beyond your line of vision. It’s better to be safe than sorry.

Start very, very small. When you’re starting at zero, it may be maddening to think that you’re going to start off doing very little and staying at that level for a while before advancing. However, doing so is imperative so you can keep your injury risk at bay. When you begin, aim for 5 minutes of movement, interspersed between walking and running breaks. We call these “run-walk” or “walk-run” ratios. If, for example, you want to go out for 5 minutes, see what it feels like to run for 1 minute and then run for 30 seconds, and then repeat for the entirety of the 5 minute timeframe. In time, slowly but surely you will likely find that you can decrease your walking ratio and increase your running ratio. In addition, you may find that you’ll be able to bump-up your overall time, too, maybe going from 5 minutes, to 10 minutes, to 15, and so on.

Start very, very slowly. Don’t get trapped into thinking that in order to run, you have to sprint, as that can’t be further from the truth. When you’re building your running stamina, you should focus on keeping your pace easy and conversational — really, you should be able to sing and talk while you do it. Sprinting can be an effective way to get faster, but for now, when you’re focusing on building your stamina, it’s more important to keep the fire burning sloooooooowly.

Make incremental gains. It’s important to be patient with yourself as you embark on this new endeavor. Don’t think that you can make huge jumps right off the bat because you’re probably going to feel pretty sore as your body gets used to this new task that you’re asking of it. Maybe you’ll go out to run/walk for 5 minutes for an entire week before bumping up one of your days to 10 minutes or 15. You’re really an experiment of one here, so what works for your training partner may not work for you, and that’s ok. Keep in touch with your body and all the feedback that it’s giving you.

Join a training group. Finally, one of the best — and most fun! — ways to build your running stamina will be to join a local training group. It’ll be a great place for you to meet other runners with similar goals, and if you’re lucky, you’ll even find someone who’ll be run/walking similar paces as you. The mileage and time passes by so much more quickly — and so much more enjoyably! — when you get to share it with someone else. It’ll be like the healthiest happy hour you can have. Plus, you’ll be working under the supervision and guidance of a knowledgeable and qualified coach who can help to ensure that you’re progressing safely.

These are just a handful of the ways that you can work to build your running stamina. The underlying principle here is the importance of building your stamina slowly, cautiously, and conservatively. As long as you do that, you’ll be able to enjoy your miles and trails for years to come.

Happy trails to you!

Guest Post by Jane Grates

AUTHOR’S BIO: JANE GRATES

I love to run for marathons and trail running events. Producing at the sweet spot between beauty and mathematics to save the world from bad design. She also loves to write reviews on Runnerclick.

 

Tour the Park 365 Days a Year

Due to the increasing popularity of the Piedmont Park Conservancy’s Docent-led History Tours, the Conservancy has decided to publish a self-guided tour! This allows tourists and locals to experience a tour of the Park regardless of what day or time it is. Download the printable and foldable PDF to experience Piedmont Park in a whole new way. From learning about how the Conservancy has impacted the Park to gorgeous views of Lake Clara Meer, the tour is sure to provide new knowledge and great photograph opportunities of Atlanta’s green heart.

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The PDF can be printed front and back, and then folded into two brochures for easy carrying.

Her Happy Place

Leaning forward and lacing her shoes, Sylvia Russell feels the calm breeze of fall hit her face.

Looking around, she sees a child gazing at her father with arms wide open. A biker leaves a swell of wind when she dashes past on a winding path.

Tap. Tap. Tap. At the Active Oval, Sylvia’s shoes hit the gravel as she begins her run.

Ever since she was diagnosed with breast cancer, Sylvia has been faced with a choice: take medications or do high intensity workouts to tackle the increased chance of osteoporosis.

“It makes a difference that I have Piedmont Park,” Russell says as she explains her choice of working out. “I don’t even feel like I am exercising.”

Her heartbeat increasing, Sylvia’s busy mind begins to slow down and find focus.

“Whatever problem I am facing or stress I’m feeling when I enter the park, by the time I leave, the load seems lighter,” says Russell, “that’s why I call Piedmont Park my happy place.”
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As Sylvia finishes her final lap around the Active Oval, she looks around at all the people in the Park. “As I frequent this park, I see all walks of life come through here,” she says, “and it makes me feel good; it’s how I want the world to be.”

Like thousands of other Atlantans, Sylvia has found a place in beautiful Piedmont Park that makes health and exercise an enjoyable experience.

It’s because of the work of the Piedmont Park Conservancy that Sylvia and others have access to a 208 acre park that is beautiful, clean, safe and active. The Piedmont Park Conservancy, a nonprofit organization, raises and invests $3 million annually to enhance and program this historic green space.  Many do not realize that the Conservancy relies heavily on philanthropic donations as it does not receive direct funding from events or festivals.

Though, “to remain beautiful, the park needs help,” Russell says. “It depends on the contributions of the community. It feels free because you don’t have to pay to get in here, but it’s costly to run a park. And it’s worth it. It’s an investment for Midtown and Atlanta.”

Take pride and give promise to Piedmont Park by making a donation to the Piedmont Park Conservancy.

Seven Men. 208 Acres. One Big Impact.

Every morning around 7:30am, seven men wearing “Piedmont Park Conservancy” imprinted on their chest set out on golf carts, trucks and mowers to tackle the 200 plus acres of beautiful Piedmont Park. With the sun slowly rising, the smell of morning dew and a small collection of people seen jogging through the Park, each man starts the day on his own mission. Some will pick up rakes and blowers. Others will count out screws and wires. A few will check systems and computers, hoping no new surprises popped up overnight.

Amongst trees, flowers and open fields of grass, you will typically find Landscaper John Frazier. Being with the Piedmont Park Conservancy for over 14 years, John says that he loves his job because he can work with his hands and enjoy the outdoors, all while watching the fruits of his labor grow. John is usually paired with contract worker Chris who likes “making the Park look pretty for people to enjoy.”

“The atmosphere is great,” John says. “The people I work with have great attitudes. It’s a great learning process. Making the Park better each year is great.”
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John Frazier

Peek between buildings and spot a red golf cart to find Operations Manager Todd Williard. Todd began working at the Conservancy because of his interest in the preservation of Piedmont Park.

“I demonstrate my love for the park by showing up every day,” Todd says. “I enjoy working outside, and I love being involved in the Conservancy.”

Todd, often found wearing his cowboy hat and a button down shirt, is the go-to man for detailed projects, broken machines, and handy work that the average person looks at with a blank stare.

Wind around the corner and find Stanley Lofton, another landscaper with a friendly personality and often a wave. Stanley spends his days blowing an immense amount of leaves, mowing large acres of grass, budding flowers to promote their growth and so much more. Ask Stanley how his day is going, and you are always met with enthusiasm and passion.

“I love the Park people,” Stanley says. Working in Piedmont Park has “a sense of freedom. Piedmont Park has history, you know? I’m from Atlanta, and Piedmont Park is the crown jewel of the city. I’m part of Piedmont Park, and Piedmont Park is part of me.”

Stanley Lofton

Keep walking through the Park, and find a man standing on a ladder tinkering away: Maintenance Engineer Michael Paul. Usually surrounded by an immense amount of tools and measuring tape, Michael performs multiple roles from technical projects to IT functions for the Conservancy. Michael expresses the same passion and dedication in his work as the other team members.

“I support the mission of the Conservancy,” Michael says. “It makes me proud because when people stop, ask me questions and say that they enjoy the Park, I know how much work goes into it. I get the opportunity to interact with the public which opens the door to talk about the Conservancy.”

Michael Paul testing Legacy Fountain under ground

Hop over to the Active Oval to see Landscaper Alan Wise, continuously mowing or raking the fields in systematic lines and patterns to beautifully curate the sport fields. Alan works hard to care for the fields which attract over 68,000 reserved players each year.

Alan loves Piedmont Park “because it’s the heart of the city [and] it connects people with nature.”

Some of Alan’s other duties include checking reservation permits, managing signage, and prepping bases, nets and other recreational items. When he isn’t working on the Oval, Alan aids the other team members to further beautify the Park such as mulching the Dog Parks, supporting volunteers and trash pickup.

Alan Wise raking the fields

Need to take a bathroom break? You might run into Landscaper Lorenzo Marshall. Toting buckets, cleaning supplies and a friendly spirit, Lorenzo is charged with taking care of all of the bathrooms in Piedmont Park. With an increased visitation of Piedmont Park, this job gets harder and harder every day. Yet, Lorenzo always shows up and gets the job done. After cleaning bathrooms, Lorenzo might be found clearing pathways, caring for plants and other landscape projects.

Lorenzo Marshall

Lastly, you might see Mark Nelson driving by checking on various projects or sitting in a meeting to strategize the next move. Mark, the Director of Operations, impressively manages the team and the countless projects that pop up all over Piedmont Park. He determines which projects are delegated to the Conservancy team or the City of Atlanta. He communicates with the rest of the staff to update them on projects and field incoming questions. Mark also gets his hands dirty, using his horticultural and landscape expertise to complete specialized projects with the Park.

Mark Nelson

Standing from any Piedmont Park gate looking in, anywhere your eyes can see is likely to be impacted by the Piedmont Park Conservancy operations staff. Whether you love to visit the Dog Parks, play in the playgrounds, shop at the Green Market, attend camp, splash in the Legacy Fountain, or jog around the running track, you can see the efforts of this hardworking team.  The Conservancy is lucky to have such a dedicated and self-motivated team that also hold personal passions for the work that they do. The next time you are out in the Park, give a wave hello and strike up a conversation. They’re friendly guys, and are definitely Piedmont Park Proud.

4 Reasons to Take the Piedmont Park History Tour

There is nothing like the experience of immersing yourself in history, especially if the history is about your city’s backyard. Here are four reasons to take the Piedmont Park History Tour.

1. Discover Something New

Purchased by the City of Atlanta in 1904, Piedmont Park is rooted in Atlanta’s history. While many Atlantans have visited and treasure beautiful Piedmont Park, they may not know what was happening on the same ground under their feet dozens of years before. On the tour, you will discover its vivid history, stunning resilience and growth, and abundant beauty. From the accounts of Booker T. Washington’s mark on the Atlanta Exposition to the cluster of trees dedicated to well-renowned literary authors, the fascinating facts about Piedmont Park are timeless. Whether you are on your first or fifteenth visit, the tour awards you with the pleasure of establishing a new understanding of the Park and its influence on Atlanta’s history.

“The tour is such a great reminder of how Piedmont Park is woven into the fabric that is Atlanta.” – Kathy Ashe, Olmsted Society Member of the Piedmont Park Conservancy

2. Meet Like-Minded People

The Piedmont Park History Tour is a great way to meet new people or spend time with those who share a passion for Atlanta history or green space. The tour attracts neighbors, frequent visitors of the park and first-time visitors. Perhaps you’ll befriend another park lover on the tour, and then exchange contact information or enjoy a post-tour cup of coffee at the Green Market.

3. Instill Passion for Parks

With its unique and earthy history, the tour also encourages weekend family outings. If your family members love to engulf themselves in lush greenery and distinctive wildlife, or if historical landmarks and old truths thrill them, the park tour is perfect. The experience cultivates enthusiasm, dedication and love for all of what has Piedmont Park to offer. When you discover that Piedmont Park has been the backdrop of Gay Pride since 1972, for instance, or the home to the highly anticipated Atlanta Dogwood Festival, you will leave with a better understanding of why it is so important to preserve this gorgeous green space as a resource to Atlanta’s cultural and recreational events.

The tour is family and dog friendly. Grab your stroller and spend a day in the Park! Maybe the tour will persuade you or your guests to get involved with the Piedmont Park Conservancy such as helping to maintain the park’s beauty and cleanliness, all the while ensuring a safe space for the local community.

4. Make a Day at Piedmont Park

If you are new to Atlanta or only visiting with family and friends, the Piedmont Park Tour is a great resource for experiencing most of Piedmont Park in a short amount of time. First, arrive early to check out Green Market, where local farmers display tables of colorful veggies, fruits, and other merchandise. Then, take the docent-led guided tour to relive the park’s history. The docent will show you monuments, gorgeous trees, great Atlanta skylines (photo op!), and more – all within 60 to 90 minutes. Plus, both the Green Market and the tour are free to attend!

From learning about the contemporary design of the 1976 Noguchi Playscape to the Active Oval which was formerly a horse race track, the Piedmont Park History Tour is a noteworthy event to attend. It is hosted during Green Market which is on Saturdays from March to December (exclusion dates apply – check calendar for confirmation). The market is open from 9am-1pm, and the tour starts promptly at 11am. The market is at the 12th Street and Piedmont Avenue gate. Meet at the Piedmont Park Conservancy and Green Market information table. *$5 donation encouraged.

Guest Post by Annierra Matthews

Top Things You Need to Know about Splish Splash Doggie Bash

On the first week of October, Atlanta’s pups are going to be wet and wild! The Piedmont Park Conservancy will be hosting Splish Splash Doggie Bash on October 7 and 8, a sell-out dog pool party that makes for great headlines and pictures. Come join the fun with hundreds of other pooches and people this fall. Here are the top things you can be excited about for this year’s bash.

  1. This is the ONLY weekend that dogs get to “take a dip” in Piedmont Park’s pool!
  2. We have supporters and sponsors giving away a ton of FREE dog-related swag, treats and toys.
  3. People can enjoy adult beverages at a cash bar while their four-legged friends practice their dog paddle. (Exception: We cannot sell alcohol on Sundays prior to 12:30pm.)
  4. Meet Ponce – Piedmont Park’s Dog of the Year- and her owners at some of our sessions.
  5. Don’t have a dog but want to join the fun? This is the first year that we have audience viewing tickets that do not require a canine.

Wondering if your dog is suitable for the event?

  • Swimming or not, dogs can have a great time at this event. Dogs that are comfortable with jumping in will have plenty of opportunities. Also, less comfortable dogs can use the zero entry area, or sit poolside bathing in the sun.
  • Lastly, don’t think that the size of your dog will determine his or her boldness to play along! We have seen Olympic-courage from small dogs and giant dogs that prefer the shallow end.

Tickets go on sale to the public on September 1. Are you a member of the Piedmont Park Conservancy, or want to join? Members get early registration from August 28 through August 31.

Link for more information and registration: https://www.piedmontpark.org/splishsplash/