Over 70 Trees Planted in Piedmont Park

With a rapidly increasing population in Atlanta, fighting negative environmental impacts can seem impossible. However, the solution to this issue can be found in Piedmont Park: trees.

To prepare for the increase in visitors that spring brings, the Piedmont Park Conservancy has been hard at work over the past two months to ensure that the Park stays green and gorgeous for all. After collaborating with Trees Atlanta, Grady High School and our own staff and board members, 74 new trees were planted on Oak Hill, the Meadow and in the Dog Parks. These trees will help keep the Park cooler during the warm spring and summer months, remove pollution from the air and be a home for native birds and other pollinators.

Urban trees provide a multitude of benefits for all Park visitors including clean air, shade in the summer, a food source for pollinators and  a connection to a place and time. Newly planted trees offer hope for the future, and mature trees that live for 100 years act as historical markers for time and events. – Erica Glasener, Community Involvement and Events Manager

The Piedmont Park Conservancy is looking forward to continuing our dedication to providing a green space that is clean, safe and beautiful. However, we cannot do it alone. Your donation supports our efforts and keeps historic Piedmont Park clean, green and active.

PC: Bee Downtown

Bee Aware: Spring May Bring Honeybee Colonies to Piedmont Park

If you’ve visited Piedmont Park recently, you may have noticed something unusual in the trees near the Invesco Beehives in the Piedmont Commons. You may also wonder if it was left there on accident.

Photo Credit: Bee Downtown

These biodegradable landscaping pots were hung in the trees on purpose by our friends at Bee Downtown. The pots are called “swarm traps” and are used for best beekeeping practices from the months of March through July. Honeybee colonies grow quickly, and when they outgrow their hive, spread through a process called swarming.

PC: Bee Downtown

Photo Credit: Bee Downtown

When a colony swarms, 60% of the bees leave the hive to search for a new one. The group takes flight, clusters up and latches on to whatever they can find while scout bees look for a new home. This is where the swarm traps are put to use. They provide a home for the colony and allow Bee Downtown to safely relocate the bees to a more permanent home.

While alarming at first, honeybee swarms are harmless. The bees have no home so they have nothing to defend and their bellies are so full of honey that they can’t bend over to sting!

Photo Credit: Bee Downtown

If you see a swarm anywhere, whether it’s on a tree or in a box, please call or text the Lead BDT Beekeeper, Nick Weaver, at 678-779-8143 or Pam Allen at 770-310-1673. 

If you have any bee-related questions or concerns, please email info@bee-downtown.com